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About

This studio course surveys the many ways in which contemporary artists respond to, remake, and intervene in places, and teaches students to articulate their own creative responses to place. We will be working intensively in Providence’s Jewelry District, collaboratively creating a public artwork and developing each person’s creative practice in response to the narrative and aesthetic prompts of this contested space. The course will culminate in a final exhibition of student projects curated by the students themselves.

INSTRUCTOR
Prof. Betsey Biggs

PARTICIPANTS
Adj Marshall
Chris Johnson-Roberson
Claire Kwong
Dia Barghouti
Elysian McNiff
Emily Bryant
Eve Blazo
Jamie Marsicano
Jenny Sparks
Josephine Devanbu
Judy Park
Kristy Choi
Lizzie Stanton
Nick Gomez-Hall

27 December 11
My daily visits to the derelict Victory Finishing Factory involved sneaking past sleeping homeless people to loot masses of cheap empty containers and gold ornaments.  In an attempt to make sense of my voyeuristic interest in poverty, I obsessively rearranged the pieces within a pristine project studio in the Granoff, Brown’s new, 40 million dollar Creative Arts Center. At worst, the installation is a failed infographic depicting wealth distribution in the US. At best, it is a monument to someone else’s pain. At least, it is shiny. 
If you’d like an ornament, send me an email with your name and address. 
Josephine Devanbu
Josephine_devanbu@brown.edu
 

My daily visits to the derelict Victory Finishing Factory involved sneaking past sleeping homeless people to loot masses of cheap empty containers and gold ornaments.  In an attempt to make sense of my voyeuristic interest in poverty, I obsessively rearranged the pieces within a pristine project studio in the Granoff, Brown’s new, 40 million dollar Creative Arts Center. At worst, the installation is a failed infographic depicting wealth distribution in the US. At best, it is a monument to someone else’s pain. At least, it is shiny. 

If you’d like an ornament, send me an email with your name and address. 

Josephine Devanbu

Josephine_devanbu@brown.edu

 

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21 December 11
Ghost Graffiti
This semester I created art on the theme of ghost narratives in the abandoned Victory Finishing Technologies factory on Globe Street.  During this time, I have seen the building progressively degrade and disappear.  For the final project, I wanted to capture the beauty of this derelict space in the short time before it is torn down.  The photographs were taken using 45-60 second exposures and lots of running around in the dark with an LED flashlight.  The results are vibrant;  whimsical yet haunting.  After all, the ghosts only have a few more weeks to romp around before their building becomes a pile of unhauntable rubble .

Ghost Graffiti

This semester I created art on the theme of ghost narratives in the abandoned Victory Finishing Technologies factory on Globe Street.  During this time, I have seen the building progressively degrade and disappear.  For the final project, I wanted to capture the beauty of this derelict space in the short time before it is torn down.  The photographs were taken using 45-60 second exposures and lots of running around in the dark with an LED flashlight.  The results are vibrant;  whimsical yet haunting.  After all, the ghosts only have a few more weeks to romp around before their building becomes a pile of unhauntable rubble .

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19 December 11

Adj Marshall -Local Providence Artist

Rhode Island Jewelry Industry

I was inspired to create this piece while researching the growth and decline of the jewelry industry in RI over the last 200 years.  With the assistance of Rhode Island manufacturing census data from 1914 through 2007 and the support of jewelry scholar Juliet Friedman’s research this analog infographic was born.

 

I chose to display visually industry growth and decline as a means to draw attention to the general change in design and form over time and also highlight the transition of the jewelry industry from one of a highly individualized practice by individual silversmiths to one of mechanization and mass production.


Art serves as a voice for creating social change. As we come to terms with our industrial history we must we must not forget the jewelry industries impact on our environment and work toward remediation.  

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Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh